Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×



Details

Submitted on
November 22, 2012
Image Size
1.1 MB
Resolution
900×1594
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
282
Favourites
11 (who?)
Comments
9
Downloads
5

License

Creative Commons License
Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
×
Gluten-Free Pumpkin-Kabocha Pie by Windthin Gluten-Free Pumpkin-Kabocha Pie by Windthin
Here are this year's Thanksgiving pies:

Pre-heat oven to 425. Take three 9 inch aluminum pie pans, one 8.3 oz. Iveta vanilla gluten-free scone mix package. Put mix in mixing bowl and stir in 1/3 cup melted Earth Balance Soy Garden natural buttery spread and 1/2 cup vanilla soy milk. Mix well. Coat bottoms of pans, pulling dough up the sides a little, with the batter.

Take about 1/3 of a fresh kabocha squash after removing seeds. Dice and place in a different mixing bowl. Add two 15 oz cans pumpkin, 1.25 tsp table salt, 1 tsp ceylon cinnamon, 3/4 tsp saigon cinnamon, 1/2 tsp cassia cinnamon, 1/2 tsp ground turmeric, 1/2 tsp ground ginger, 1/2 tsp ground mace, 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg, 2 tbsp Ener-G egg replacer, 1 tbsp Mexican vanilla gelatin, 1.5 tsp Mexican eggnog gelatin, 2 cups soymilk, 1 cup water, 1 tbsp rum, and 1 1/2 cups brown sugar. Mix well with hand mixer and pour out evenly into each pie tin. Top with french vanilla and gingerbread marshmallows and bake for 50 to 65 minutes.

Don't worry if the pies don't seem very solid right off; due to the lack of eggs or thicker cream, they'll initially be less set, but the egg replacer and gelatin will quickly take effect as they cool. Serve as is or top with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream (my wife, naturally, uses a safe soy or coconut ice cream).

The scone mix proved to be the perfect crust for this, as good as any I've made from scratch. The pie itself was rich, creamy, and incredible, with the chunks of kabocha melting in perfectly. Total success here.
Add a Comment:
 

The Artist has requested Critique on this Artwork

Please sign up or login to post a critique.

:iconrandomteenager98:
randomteenager98 Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
What is Kabocha ? :?
Reply
:iconwindthin:
Windthin Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2012  Professional General Artist
Kabocha squash is also known as Japanese pumpkin, and looks like a small green-striped pumpkin. The rind is edible, so you only need to remove the seeds (which, like many squash seeds, can be roasted if you so desire). It tastes like a cross between sweet potato and pumpkin and is truly delicious.
Reply
:iconkirin-rosenbaum:
Kirin-Rosenbaum Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2012  Student Photographer
So what's the difference between the different cinnamons?
Reply
:iconwindthin:
Windthin Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2012  Professional General Artist
Well, there are four kinds of cinnamon: cassia, Saigon, Indonesian, and Ceylon or True. Most ground cinnamon sold in the US is actually cassia cinnamon; in many countries, its illegal to label cassia as just cinnamon. Most rolled cinnamon bark we get here is Indonesian. Saigon is more coarse and brash in flavor, while true cinnamon, Ceylon cinnamon, is more aromatic and bold, with a very rich flavor. There are definite differences in scent, consistency, and flavor for each kind. My father actually has all four kinds in his kitchen, and I'd love to do the same.
Reply
:iconkirin-rosenbaum:
Kirin-Rosenbaum Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2012  Student Photographer
wow i never knew that
Reply
:iconwindthin:
Windthin Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2012  Professional General Artist
I didn't for many years either until I saw a container of Saigon cinnamon and looked it up to discover the difference. That's when I learned about the four kinds and decided I just had to try them.
Reply
:iconkirin-rosenbaum:
Kirin-Rosenbaum Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2012  Student Photographer
Where would I find the different ones?
Reply
:iconwindthin:
Windthin Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Professional General Artist
Well, many stores have saigon cinnamon now if you look around. Cassia cinnamon is what is commonly just called "cinnamon" in the US. I had to order Ceylon cinnamon online (I did it via Amazon), and I imagine you could do the same with Indonesian, or try a specialty spice shop.
Reply
:iconkirin-rosenbaum:
Kirin-Rosenbaum Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Student Photographer
Might have to check out Whole Foods.
Reply
Add a Comment: