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Criminara Sauce by Windthin Criminara Sauce by Windthin
The first time I made Criminara Sauce was a year ago, as can be found here: [link]

This is my second time, and it might almost be called Criminarum. It's called Criminara for its crimson coloration and its similarity to marinara in both appearance and texture, despite not involving tomatoes at all. The first time I made this was the first time I discovered I could make fruit-based sauces as good as tomato sauces, particularly blends of stone fruits (apricot, plum, peach, cherry, and others) and mango.

CRIMINARA SAUCE (MARK II)

Remove stones and stems from 12 black velvet apricots starting to get soft and puree in food processor. Place in medium-small saucepan. Remove skins and pits from 1 ripe common mango, 1 slightly underripe ataulfo mango, and 2 over-ripe ataulfo mangoes (old enough to be largely brown and easy to remove from skin but still sweet and edible) and dice. Puree in food processor and add to saucepan as well with 1 cup of water, 1/4 cup golden rum, 1/4 cup apple wine, 1/4 cup year-old watermelon wine, 1 tbsp kosher salt, 2 tbsp turbinado sugar, and the zest from one mostly green ugli fruit. Cook together on medium low for 45 minutes, stirring regularly, then drop heat to low. About an hour into cooking (as a whole), stir in another tbsp each of turbinado sugar and kosher salt. Continue to cook, stirring and tasting.

After about 90 to 120 minutes of cooking raised the heat up to 5 (medium high) for 5-6 minutes to help carmelize the sugars, then swiftly dropped it back to 2 (low). Add 1 tbsp turbinado sugar, 4 tbsp buckwheat honey, and half of your fresh basil (see below). If desired, add 1 cup of water to thin sauce a bit and continue to cook down.

Cook down to desired consistency. You may add more water if desired, or a thickener. We ended up with a delightfully tart sauce that goes very well with something savory, like the meal below.

Ataulfo mangoes are also known as champagne or honey mangoes. They're smaller than comon mangoes, with a distinctive swoosh of a shape that makes them look a bit like a giant yellow-orange bean, and tend to be sweeter.

The watermelon wine we have is local-made, and we've found that it is very different ages than fresh. Fresh it is fairly mild and fruity, while aged it takes on a much stronger aroma and flavor, more like hard liquor almost. Ours was probably made late last summer, so should be nice and aged.

Ugli fruit zest is by far the most aromatic I've ever experienced in a citrus fruit, especially when the fruit is not so ripe. The more green, the better for ugli zest, I say.

Now, I make a batch of my sauce and then use it with several consecutive dishes usually, so there will be enough of this sauce to have wiht something else, but we had the first helping with this:

I spread 2 lbs ground turkey with some olive oil across a large, square ridge-bottomed skillet, browning on medium (4). To this I added 1 tbsp salt, 1 bulb of garlic (peeled, germ removed, and diced), 1 tbsp oregano, 1 6 oz (dr wt) can of black olives (drained), and 1 plum (stone removed and chopped). Stir regularly.

Take two sprigs of basil and chop leaves and stalks fully. Place half in fruit sauce (as above) and half in meat sauce about 10-15 minutes after adding last batch of ingredients above. Cook another 10-15 minutes, still stirring regularly. I cooked it until it just begin to crisp nicely, so that it was almost grilled, and you could hear it sizzle and occasionally pop.

As many know, I cook like this to counter my wife's numerous food allergies since she had her appendix out for years back. She can't have gluten, tomatoes, dairy, nuts, peanuts... it's a vast list I will go into another time, but it means I tend to make two batches of noodles, one for her, one for me. The noodles and dish on the left in the picture are hers, the ones on the right were mine. My wife had hers over fun brown rice noodle shapes with Galaxy Foods fake parmesan topping and I had mine over egg noodles with shredded Italian cheeses.

The final picture is just Vinnie showing how much he enjoyed sampling as well. Both he and Maui have a habit of coming over to have 'their dinner' with me.
:iconvampirequeeneffeffia:
VampireQueenEffeffia Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Recipe in description? Nice touch! It looks yummy, and I'm sure the little birdie agrees!
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:iconwindthin:
Windthin Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2013  Professional General Artist
Thanks! Oh yes he does. Also, I always post full recipes for any dish I put up. It's my hope to inspire others to try out new things in their kitchens!
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:iconvampirequeeneffeffia:
VampireQueenEffeffia Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I believe your mission is going to be a success ^_^
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